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ESTABLISHING A STEREOSCOPIC TECHNIQUE FOR DETERMINING THE KINEMATIC PROPERTIES OF SOLAR WIND TRANSIENTS BASED ON A GENERALIZED SELF-SIMILARLY EXPANDING CIRCULAR GEOMETRY
Davies, J. A.1; Perry, C. H.1; Trines, R. M. G. M.2,3; Harrison, R. A.1; Lugaz, N.4; Moestl, C.5,6,7; Liu, Y. D.8; Steed, K.9; 北京8701信箱
Department空间天气学国家重点实验室
Source PublicationASTROPHYSICAL JOURNAL
2013-11-10
Volume777Issue:2Pages:167
ISSN0004-646X
Language英语
KeywordSolar Wind Sun: Corona Sun: Coronal Mass Ejections (Cmes) Sun: Heliosphere
AbstractThe twin-spacecraft STEREO mission has enabled simultaneous white-light imaging of the solar corona and inner heliosphere from multiple vantage points. This has led to the development of numerous stereoscopic techniques to investigate the three-dimensional structure and kinematics of solar wind transients such as coronal mass ejections (CMEs). Two such methods—triangulation and the tangent to a sphere—can be used to determine time profiles of the propagation direction and radial distance (and thereby radial speed) of a solar wind transient as it travels through the inner heliosphere, based on its time-elongation profile viewed by two observers. These techniques are founded on the assumption that the transient can be characterized as a point source (fixed , FP, approximation) or a circle attached to Sun-center (harmonic mean, HM, approximation), respectively. These geometries constitute extreme descriptions of solar wind transients, in terms of their cross-sectional extent. Here, we present the stereoscopic expressions necessary to derive propagation direction and radial distance/speed profiles of such transients based on the more generalized self-similar expansion (SSE) geometry, for which the FP and HM geometries form the limiting cases; our implementation of these equations is termed the stereoscopic SSE method. We apply the technique to two Earth-directed CMEs from different phases of the STEREO mission, the well-studied event of 2008 December and a more recent event from 2012 March. The latter CME was fast, with an initial speed exceeding 2000 km s −1, and highly geoeffective, in stark contrast to the slow and ineffectual 2008 December CME.; The twin-spacecraft STEREO mission has enabled simultaneous white-light imaging of the solar corona and inner heliosphere from multiple vantage points. This has led to the development of numerous stereoscopic techniques to investigate the three-dimensional structure and kinematics of solar wind transients such as coronal mass ejections (CMEs). Two such methods-triangulation and the tangent to a sphere-can be used to determine time profiles of the propagation direction and radial distance (and thereby radial speed) of a solar wind transient as it travels through the inner heliosphere, based on its time-elongation profile viewed by two observers. These techniques are founded on the assumption that the transient can be characterized as a point source (fixed phi, FP, approximation) or a circle attached to Sun-center (harmonic mean, HM, approximation), respectively. These geometries constitute extreme descriptions of solar wind transients, in terms of their cross-sectional extent. Here, we present the stereoscopic expressions necessary to derive propagation direction and radial distance/speed profiles of such transients based on the more generalized self-similar expansion (SSE) geometry, for which the FP and HM geometries form the limiting cases; our implementation of these equations is termed the stereoscopic SSE method. We apply the technique to two Earth-directed CMEs from different phases of the STEREO mission, the well-studied event of 2008 December and a more recent event from 2012 March. The latter CME was fast, with an initial speed exceeding 2000 km s(-1), and highly geoeffective, in stark contrast to the slow and ineffectual 2008 December CME.
Indexed BySCI
Funding Project中国科学院空间科学与应用研究中心
Document Type期刊论文
Identifierhttp://ir.nssc.ac.cn/handle/122/1499
Collection空间科学部
Corresponding Author北京8701信箱
Affiliation1.Rutherford Appleton Lab, RAL Space, Harwell Oxford OX11 0QX, England
2.Rutherford Appleton Lab, Cent Laser Facil, Harwell Oxford OX11 0QX, England
3.Univ Lancaster, Dept Phys, Lancaster LA1 4YB, England
4.Univ New Hampshire, Ctr Space Sci, Durham, NH 03824 USA
5.Univ Calif Berkeley, Space Sci Lab, Berkeley, CA 94720 USA
6.Graz Univ, Inst Phys, A-8042 Graz, Austria
7.Austrian Acad Sci, Space Res Inst, A-8042 Graz, Austria
8.Chinese Acad Sci, Natl Space Sci Ctr, State Key Lab Space Weather, Beijing 100190, Peoples R China
9.Katholieke Univ Leuven, Ctr Math Plasma Astrophys, B-3001 Louvain, Belgium
Recommended Citation
GB/T 7714
Davies, J. A.,Perry, C. H.,Trines, R. M. G. M.,et al. ESTABLISHING A STEREOSCOPIC TECHNIQUE FOR DETERMINING THE KINEMATIC PROPERTIES OF SOLAR WIND TRANSIENTS BASED ON A GENERALIZED SELF-SIMILARLY EXPANDING CIRCULAR GEOMETRY[J]. ASTROPHYSICAL JOURNAL,2013,777(2):167.
APA Davies, J. A..,Perry, C. H..,Trines, R. M. G. M..,Harrison, R. A..,Lugaz, N..,...&北京8701信箱.(2013).ESTABLISHING A STEREOSCOPIC TECHNIQUE FOR DETERMINING THE KINEMATIC PROPERTIES OF SOLAR WIND TRANSIENTS BASED ON A GENERALIZED SELF-SIMILARLY EXPANDING CIRCULAR GEOMETRY.ASTROPHYSICAL JOURNAL,777(2),167.
MLA Davies, J. A.,et al."ESTABLISHING A STEREOSCOPIC TECHNIQUE FOR DETERMINING THE KINEMATIC PROPERTIES OF SOLAR WIND TRANSIENTS BASED ON A GENERALIZED SELF-SIMILARLY EXPANDING CIRCULAR GEOMETRY".ASTROPHYSICAL JOURNAL 777.2(2013):167.
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